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Knee Arthritis May be Linked to Flat Feet

A new study says

 A new study conducted by lead author K. Douglas Gross from the Boston University School of Medicine reported in the Arthritis Care & Research journal that having flat feet is linked to arthritis of the knee.  The study suggests that individuals who have flat feet are more likely to experience the “wear and tear” signs of osteoarthritis than those with arched feet, thus experiencing chronic pain in the knee, inflammation, and decreased mobility. 

 

Individuals with flat feet have a lowered arch at the inside of their foot.  You can test yourself if you are considered “flat footed” by placing your foot in a tub of water, then walk on a piece of newspaper or a sidewalk.  If you can see your entire foot print, than you are more than likely flat footed.  If you can see the toes and outer side of the foot, without the definition of the arched side that you have an arched foot.  Having flat feet can alter your posture, your gait, and the way in which you move.  One of the reasons why flat feet may cause arthritis is because when you put weight on a flat foot, it tends to rotate the lower leg inward.  Over time, this could wear away the healthy cartilage in the inner knee.  The study evaluated 1,900 adults who averaged the age of fifty (50).  Results showed that the subjects with the flattest feet were 31% more likely to experience knee pain on a daily basis.  They were also 43% more likely to show damage to the cartilage surrounding the knee. 

 

Further studies may show that there is significant value to protecting your joints early in life if you are flat footed.  It may be advisable that you wear shoe insert to support the arch.  Controlling your weight may also help, as it will take additional pressure off of the weight bearing joint (feet and knees are both weight bearing joints).  You may also want to start taking a liquid Glucosamine supplement as a preventative measure to protect healthy cartilage and to stimulate synovial fluid (the cushioning of the joints). “It is estimated that 46% of U.S. adults can expect to develop arthritis of at least one knee by the age of 85”. So, whether you have flat feet or arched feet, it may be beneficial to your health to act now.

 

To read more about how liquid glucosamine can protect your joints, please visit www.best-glucosamine.org.